Alto’s Adventure (Series) Review

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Posted: 9 months ago, last updated 9 weeks ago.

Author: Andy Robertson.

OverviewOverview

Descend beautiful mountains, dunes and canyons on a snowboarding journey full of serenity and secrets. All you have to worry about is tapping to jump to avoid chasms, rockfall and other hazards. It’s simple and moreish due to the stunning landscapes and to a feeling of flow as you charge down the mountain, but there’s real skill to doing it well. Alto’s Adventure is a good first sports game because it’s simple to control but requires a deep understanding to master.

Alto's Odyssey follows up to Alto's Adventure that extends the beautiful snowboarding down mountain descents, dunes and canyons. This time there are hot-air balloons, moving grind rails, swirling wind vortexes, rushing water and wall riding. New dynamic lighting and weather effects like sandstorms and shooting stars add to the visuals.

Both Alto's Adventure and Alto's Odyssey are available in The Alto Collection on Xbox, PlayStation 4 on August 13th, and soon on Nintendo Switch.

DetailsDetails

Rating: PEGI 3+, ESRB EVERYONE

Release Date: 19/02/2015, updated in 2018

Platforms: Android, Mac, Nintendo Switch, PC, PlayStation 4, Xbox One and iOS

Genres: Action, Platform and Racing

 

CommitmentCommitment

Duration: It takes between 1 minute and 20 minutes to play a round of this game. Sometimes you die in a few seconds, but a good run can take longer.
 
Players: This is a single player game.

CostsCosts

Does not offer in-game purchases, 'loot boxes' or 'battle/season passes'.

Age RatingsAge Ratings

This game has been rated PEGI 3+.


This game has been rated ESRB EVERYONE.

AccessibilityAccessibility

The game requires precise timing skills for when you tap to jump and how long you hold the screen to achieve flips. It gets harder the longer you stay alive on each run. You can replay tutorials at any point via menu.

There is no reading in the main game, but a lot of small text over backgrounds in the Workshop upgrade area and Your Score area. Menus are clearer text. The player character is particularly small. You can earn different characters, some of which are more visible, but these are not all available from the start. There are audio cues for your speed, jumps and power-ups, but not for upcoming visual hazards.

Difficulty

How you can adjust the challenge of play, and assistance the game offers when you fail or get stuck.

Assistance

Practice Area: You can practice freely without opponents or time pressures.

Tutorials: There are helpful tutorials, instructions and tips.

Reading

How much reading or listening comprehension is required, and how accessible this is.

Simple Minimal Reading: Minimal reading is required.

High Text Contrast: Text colour contrasts to background.

Controls

How you control the game, different options for alternative inputs and whether you can remap these settings to suit your needs.

1 Button: Can play with single button.

Mouse And Keyboard

Keyboard Alone: Can play with just the keyboard.

Mouse Alone: Can play with just the mouse/mouse button/mouse wheel.

One Tap Anywhere: Play with touchscreen, tap anywhere.

Rapid Pressing Optional: Quick, repeated button pressing not required or can be skipped or disabled.

Image

How you can adjust the visuals to suit your needs, and offer additional information if you can't hear the game.

Audio Cues for Visual Events: Audio is provided to indicate visual events.

Clear Interface: The game navigation, maps and information are clear to read, large or adjustable.

Audio

How you can adjust the audio of the game and whether audio cues compensate for aspects of the game that are hard to see.

Balance Audio Levels: Set music and game sound effects separately.

Play Without Hearing: No audio cues are necessary to play the game well

System Settings

Android has accessibility settings including ways to navigate and interact, although not all games support this. Nintendo Switch has some built-in features, including a lockable zoom, that can be used on all games. Windows has extensive accessibility features. Some, like colour correction, work with games. Lots of accessibility software can be used with PC games, from voice recognition to input device emulators. PlayStation 4 has a range of accessibility settings. Some are system only, some work in games (invert colours and button mapping). Xbox One has a system features, the excellent co-pilot share controls mode and adaptive controller support for all games. iOS has a very extensive suite of accessibility settings including ways to navigate with voice and comprehensive screen reading, though most of the features don't work with games... read more about system accessibility settings.

Supported by PlayabilityInitiative and accessibility contributors: Andy Robertson



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