Costume Quest (Series) Review

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Posted: 7 months ago, last updated 4 weeks ago.

Author: Andy Robertson and @JonahMonaghan.

OverviewOverview

Costume Quest is an adventure game where you play a trick-or-treating child when they encounter a monster that kidnaps your sibling. You travel the neighbourhood collecting items for your costume, candy and fellow children as companions in order to face the monster and rescue the sibling.

It's a light role play game where you gain abilities based on the Halloween costume you are wearing. Playing a child keeps things fun and imaginative. When you encounter monsters there is a battle where you are transformed into giant creatures and take turns to pick attacks. As you progress you build a party of children who help you in quests and battles.

Costume Quest 2 follows a similar pattern, although this time you face the evil dentist who teams up with a powerful time wizard. It has a Bill and Teds feel this time as you go back to the future to race against the clock on Halloween night to try and stop the monsters for good.

There is some violence but it is home-spun with cardboard swords and hand made weapons so things never get too graphic.

DetailsDetails

Rating: PEGI 7+, ESRB EVERYONE 10+

Release Date: 19/10/2010, updated in 2011

Platforms: Android, Mac, Nintendo Wii U, PC, PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, Xbox 360, Xbox One and iOS

Genres: Action, Adventure, Narrative, Role-Playing and Turn-Based

TipsTips

CommitmentCommitment

Duration: This game will take between 6 hours and 8 hours to complete.
 
Players: This is a single player game.

CostsCosts

Additional in-game purchases are offered for items that enhance the experience.

"Grubbins on Ice" is an additional paid chapter on Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3. On iOS, Android, PC and Mac it's either a free download or included in the main game.

Age RatingsAge Ratings

Costume Quest was rated PEGI 7 and ESRB EVERYONE 10+. ESRB expanded on its rating: Throughout the course of the game, players will encounter enemies, triggering combat sequences in which the players will morph into a "real" version of the costume they are wearing (e.g., a robot, a knight). Combat is controlled by are by pressing button sequences corresponding to on-screen prompts. Sound effects associated with battle are realistic at times. In one cutscene, a character makes a brief joke about smoking (e.g., "Oh, why did I have to pick today to quit smoking?").

AccessibilityAccessibility

In Costume Quest you can remap actions to multiple keys. This feature is not available in Costume Quest 2.

Difficulty

How you can adjust the challenge of play, and assistance the game offers when you fail or get stuck.

Low Pressure: Game tasks aren’t time-limited or with a high emphasis on performance. Or there is a low pressure play-mode available.

View Control Mapping: You can view a map of controls during play.

Reading

How much reading or listening comprehension is required, and how accessible this is.

Simple Minimal Reading: Minimal reading is required.

High Text Contrast: Text colour contrasts to background.

Any spoken content has subtitles: All spoken content has subtitles, or there is no speech in the game.

Speaker Indicator: Captions or icons and speech bubbles indicate who is speaking.

Controls

How you control the game, different options for alternative inputs and whether you can remap these settings to suit your needs.

Multiple Buttons & Single Stick: Can play with multiple buttons and a stick.

Mouse And Keyboard

Keyboard Alone: Can play with just the keyboard.

Mouse and Keys: Can play with mouse and multiple keys.

Remap Mouse and Keyboard: Remap mouse and keyboard.

Image

How you can adjust the visuals to suit your needs, and offer additional information if you can't hear the game.

No Screen Shake: No screen shake effect or this can be disabled.

Audio

How you can adjust the audio of the game and whether audio cues compensate for aspects of the game that are hard to see.

Balance Audio Levels: Set music and game sound effects separately.

Play Without Hearing: No audio cues are necessary to play the game well

System Settings

Android has accessibility settings including ways to navigate and interact, although not all games support this. The Wii U has some limited settings, such as disabling rumble and selecting mono audio. Windows has extensive accessibility features. Some, like colour correction, work with games. Lots of accessibility software can be used with PC games, from voice recognition to input device emulators. PlayStation 4 has a range of accessibility settings. Some are system only, some work in games (invert colours and button mapping). Xbox One has a system features, the excellent co-pilot share controls mode and adaptive controller support for all games. iOS has a very extensive suite of accessibility settings including ways to navigate with voice and comprehensive screen reading, though most of the features don't work with games... read more about system accessibility settings.

Supported by PlayabilityInitiative and accessibility contributors: @JonahMonaghan



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