KeyWe

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Posted: 2 weeks ago.

Author: Andy Robertson.

Overview

KeyWe is a puzzle game where you control two Kiwi birds running a postal service. At first the jobs are simple but as you complete more missions they start to become more complex. These tasks range from typing out telegrams, sending urgent messages and shipping mail to make sure the mail is flowing.

You play by using your Kiwi character to press letters and spell out letters, carrying and fetching items, stamping letters. It's a little like Overcooked with different tasks slowly racking up. Like that game, each level's location is also different that leads to other challenges and new postal contraptions.

You can customise your Kiwi by changing the colour of its feathers and through unlocking accessories like hats and face-ware. As you play you pass through the different seasons, meaning that you will start to encounter wether hazards make it increasingly hard to do jobs such as winds and thunderstorms make sending messages difficult.

You can play with a friend online or locally. This means that each player chooses a job to do and co-ordinates this with what the partner does to be effective. It's a nice communication challenge with logical thinking, spelling and puzzles woven into the fabric of the postal-themed experience.

"We want KeyWe to be an experience that is warm, lighthearted that you can play with a friend or on your own," said the developers. It's is planned for a release in 2021 on PC.

Details

Release date: Coming soon

Platforms: PC.

Genres: Action and Puzzle.

Developer: @StoneWheat

 

Tips

Commitment

Duration: It takes between 2 hours and 5 hours to play a round of this game. Depending on how quickly you finish each shift will impact the duration of each round.
 
Players: You can play with 2 players in the same room and up to 2 players online.

Costs

Does not offer in-game purchases, 'loot boxes' or 'battle/season passes'.

You don’t need a paid subscription to play this game online.

Age Ratings

No ratings available for this game.


Users Interact: The game enables players to interact and communicate with each other, so may expose players to language usually associated with older rated games.

Accessibility

Accessibility for this game is as follows:
System Settings

Windows has extensive accessibility features. Some, like colour correction, work with games. Lots of accessibility software can be used with PC games, from voice recognition to input device emulators... read more about system accessibility settings.


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