King of Dragon Pass

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Posted: 3 weeks ago, last updated 12 days ago.

Author: Andy Robertson and Rich Adams.

Overview

King of Dragon Pass is a fantasy strategy game where you control barbarian clans settling in the dangerous frontier region of Dragon Pass.

You play as the Orlanthi clan, who have fled from their home after a foreign magician has usurped the throne. Along with dozens of other Orlanthi clans, the clan seeks to build a new home in Dragon Pass, a previously populated area left deserted after the Dragonkill War hundreds of years ago.

You control the seven-member clan in all aspects of its life, such as trading, warfare, agriculture and diplomacy. The game is played in seasons, in each of which you can make two top-level decisions. You then see how events play out (mundane law disputes, spiritual or demonic incursions, political disagreements).

To succeed you must balance resources and manage clan individuals to your benefit. A lack of food might be solvable by clearing more farmland, but when the forest responds by sending a talking fox to urge leaving the trees alone, a wrong choice could bring the clan hunters to war with their environment. Likewise, should a member of the clan act in a selfish and foolish manner, action needs to be taken to stabilise and defuse the situation, if necessary.

King of Dragon Pass is unusual in that it depicts action with hand-drawn artwork rather than animation. It was originally a commercial failure, but became a cult classic. This led to it coming to other platforms, and the spiritual successor, Six Ages: Ride Like The Wind, being released in 2018.

Details

Release date: January 1999

Platforms: Android, PC and iOS.

Genres: Narrative, Role-Playing, Simulation, Strategy and Turn-Based.

Developer: @kingdragonpass

 

Tips

Commitment

Players: This is a single player game.

Costs

Does not offer in-game purchases, 'loot boxes' or 'battle/season passes'.

Age Ratings

Rated PEGI 7 for mild violence.

ESRB EVERYONE 10+ for fantasy violence. The PC version was originally rated TEEN when released in 1999.

Accessibility

The iOS version has the following accessibility settings:
Difficulty

How you can adjust the challenge of play, and assistance the game offers when you fail or get stuck.

Cognitive Pressure

Reaction-time Not Critical: Individual game actions don’t need quick reactions.

Low Pressure: Game tasks aren’t time-limited or with a high emphasis on performance. Or there is a low pressure play-mode available.

Save Anytime: The game automatically saves progress or you can save any time, and not lose progress.

Tutorials: There are helpful tutorials, instructions and tips.

No Unlocking Required: Access any mode, location, character, weapon or vehicle from the start.

Reading

How much reading or listening comprehension is required, and how accessible this is.

Moderate Reading: Moderate reading required.

Voiced

All Dialogue is Voiced: All of the game dialogue and narrative can be voiced.

Menus are Voiced: All of the game menus can be narrated for easier navigation.

Controls

How you control the game, different options for alternative inputs and whether you can remap these settings to suit your needs.

Touchscreen

Touchscreen controls for this game are:

One Tap Anywhere: Play with touchscreen, tap anywhere.

One Motion Targeted: Play with touchscreen, tap and swipe or hold gesture.

Image

How you can adjust the visuals to suit your needs, and offer additional information if you can't hear the game.

Colourblind friendly: Game doesn’t rely on colour or can switch to colourblind friendly mode.

Play Without Sight: The game can be played without visuals.

Audio

How you can adjust the audio of the game and whether audio cues compensate for aspects of the game that are hard to see.

Play Without Hearing: No audio cues are necessary to play the game well

System Settings

Android has accessibility settings including ways to navigate and interact, although not all games support this. Windows has extensive accessibility features. Some, like colour correction, work with games. Lots of accessibility software can be used with PC games, from voice recognition to input device emulators. iOS has a very extensive suite of accessibility settings including ways to navigate with voice and comprehensive screen reading, though most of the features don't work with games... read more about system accessibility settings.

Supported by PlayabilityInitiative and accessibility contributors: @superblindman


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If games offer an escape from chaos, these games are particularly good at granting a sense of satisfying agency and power as they do that. Whether it’s ordering the perfect stock room in Wilmot’s Warehouse, organising your island in Animal Crossing, perfectly controlling the flow of traffic in Mini Motorways or even build civilisation just the way you want it in Civilization the sense of satisfaction and calm from the achievement is second to none.
 

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Image 221We have partnered with the National Literacy Trust to create this resource of video games that encourage and enable reading and writing skills.

The National Literacy Trust is a charity dedicated to improving the reading, writing, speaking and listening skills of children and young people who need it most, giving them the best possible chance of success in school, work and life.

Video games have significant benefits for children who are reluctant or struggling readers. They give them access to stories through interaction and world building which they may not have been able to read in print. Video games also have benefits for families where parents may not be confident readers, meaning that sharing stories as a family is still accessible to all. The rise of video games on smartphones and tablets, as well as more affordable game consoles has made the sharing of interactive stories easier.

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These games have an educational element to them, but also offer experiences that are good games in their own right. This isn't busywork to trick you into learning, but clever and innovative ways to encounter history, physics, engineering, maths, geography and language subjects without feeling like you are in school. They also teach softer, deeper skills like long term strategy, planning, balancing systems, emotional intelligence, compassion, team-work and self-care.

Some of these games are aimed at younger players to play on their own, but others (as indicated by their PEGI ratings) are better for teenagers or played together in a family. Find some games that pique your interest, read through the details and decide how your child might benefit from playing them.
 

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All games offer you agency. You can win or lose. You can complete them or stop at any time. But there are some games that offer a story that genuinely branches. Where you end up will be different from other players. This not only makes your actions really matter but also gives you a reason to play them again.

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