Stacking

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Posted: 5 months ago.

Author: Andy Robertson.

Overview

Stacking is puzzle game where characters are Russian stacking matryoshka dolls. Controlling the smallest doll in the game, Charlie Blackmore, you go on an adventure. Your main ability is that you can stack and unstack into larger dolls and gain their abilities to solve puzzles.

It's a novel idea made all the better because each puzzle has a number of ways it can be solved. Find a particularly elegant solution and you find additional puzzles and challenges that flesh out the wider world of the game.

The game is set in a fictional industrial age and tracks with events of the time featuring chimney sweeps, powerful industrialists and child apprenticeships. As Charlie, you are tasked with rescuing your siblings from the workhouse as coal shovelers.

Details

Release date: February 2011

Platforms: Mac, PC, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 and Xbox One.

Genres: Adventure, Narrative and Puzzle.

 

Tips

Commitment

Duration: This game will take between 4 hours and 6 hours to complete.
 
Players: This is a single player game.

Costs

Additional in-game purchases are offered for items that enhance the experience.

In-game purchases for "The Lost Hobo King" additional chapters with a substantial new adventure.

Age Ratings

This game has been rated PEGI 7+.

Rated ESRB EVERYONE 10+ with Crude Humor, Mild Cartoon Violence, Mild Suggestive Themes, Use of Tobacco.

Accessibility

Accessibility for this game is as follows:
System Settings

Windows has extensive accessibility features. Some, like colour correction, work with games. Lots of accessibility software can be used with PC games, from voice recognition to input device emulators. Xbox One has a system features, the excellent co-pilot share controls mode and adaptive controller support for all games... read more about system accessibility settings.


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Similar Games

The following games are like Stacking. They address a similar topic or offer a similar way to play. They are good options to play next and also good alternatives to Stacking for younger age ratings.

Stacking is in These Lists

In addition to the similar games listed above, which have been linked to this game specifically in the database, you may find games with a similar theme to Stacking in the following lists:

Walk in Someone Else's Shoes

While many games include characters to interact with, some are specifically designed to make relationships a central element. Whether this is during the rounds of a puzzle game amidst a zombie outbreak or as we race cars around a circuit, they can offer a unique way to think deeply about how we relate to each other and to the games people play.
In contrast to films or books, characters and relationships in video games need to be discovered by the player. Some of my favourite relational moments in games happen amidst other action. Often these other actions – whether shooting, puzzle-solving, or fetching and carrying – serve to underline the difficult, awkward and snatched nature of interpersonal interactions.
 

Educational Games That Are Also Good Games

These games have an educational element to them, but also offer experiences that are good games in their own right. This isn't busywork to trick you into learning, but clever and innovative ways to encounter history, physics, engineering, maths, geography and language subjects without feeling like you are in school. They also teach softer, deeper skills like long term strategy, planning, balancing systems, emotional intelligence, compassion, team-work and self-care.

Some of these games are aimed at younger players to play on their own, but others (as indicated by their PEGI ratings) are better for teenagers or played together in a family. Find some games that pique your interest, read through the details and decide how your child might benefit from playing them.
 

Know Your Body

Video games offer an opportunity to inhabit another body. Whether we step into the powerful frame of a trained marksman or brave adventurer, while we play we have a different sense of our physicality.

This is not only an enjoyable way to escape the reality of daily life but a chance to reflect on and understand ourselves, and our bodies, better. Stepping into the shoes of a vulnerable, small or endangered character can help us understand for a short while some of what it is like to be someone else.

Whether this is into the awkward teenage years of Mord and Ben in Wide Ocean Big Jacket, the grandparent-escaping Tiger and Bee in Kissy Kissy, the fractured heartbroken body in Gris or the haphazard movement of Octodad we have a chance to reassess our own physicality and how we respond to and treat other people's physicality.

More specifically, to use body therapy language, games offer us a chance to discover the inviolability of our bodies, personal autonomy, self-ownership, and self-determination. In travel, as Andrew Soloman says, we go somewhere else to see properly the place where we have come from. In video games, we step into other bodies so we can better understand our own and those of the people around us.
 
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