The Last Of Us II (Series)

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Posted: 3 weeks ago.

Author: Andy Robertson.

Overview

The Last of Us Part II is an action-adventure game set five years after The Last of Us. You control two characters in a post-apocalyptic United States. Ellie is out for revenge after suffering a tragedy, and Abby is a soldier who becomes involved in a conflict between the militia and a cult.

Although the game has the common shooting with firearms and fighting with improvised weapons, you must also use stealth and covert tactics to survive. The main hostiles are humans and mutated creatures from a strain of the Cordyceps fungus. The complex cover system enables you to use obstacles to gain advantages and circumnavigate dangerous encounters. Running through the action is a deep and mature story about commitment, anger and love.

Commitment

Duration: This game will take between 24 hours and 26 hours to complete. It will take longer on harder difficulties and you can replay the game on New Game + mode for further longevity.
 
Players: This is a single player game.

Costs

Does not offer in-game purchases, 'loot boxes' or 'battle/season passes'.

There are different versions of the game available for collectors in both digital and physical form:
  • Last of Us Part II Standard Edition: The game on its own.
  • Last of Us Part II Digital Deluxe Edition: Digital soundtrack, Digital Dark Horse mini art book, Six PSN avatars for PS4, PS4 dynamic theme.
  • The Last of Us Part II Special Edition: 48-page mini art book, steelbook, PS4 Avatar set, Dynamic theme.
  • The Last of Us Part II Ellie Edition: Amray Case, Steelbook, Premium packaging, Statue, Premium art print, Letter, 48 page mini art book, Ellie's bracelet, Replica of Ellie's backpack, Exclusive keychain, Vinyl record, Avatar set, Digital soundtrack, Digital artbook, Making-of documentary access, Additional digital content.

Age Ratings

Rated PEGI 18 for violence against vulnerable and defenceless characters., graphic violence and use of strong language. Violent scenes vary across the board from moderate pushing and shoving, strong scenes of stabbings and shootings, to extreme scenes of disembowelling, dismemberment, and torture, including scenes of violence towards vulnerable or defenceless persons. These scenes are shown in graphic detail complete with blood and close-up up gore effects, with visible gross injuries.

Sexual expletives, mild swearing and offensive language are heard throughout the game and include the words “*!@?*”, “*!@?*”, “*!@?*”, “dick”, “dyke”, “goddamn” and “*!@?*”.
Secondary issues/information

The game also contains scenes of illegal drug use in the form of characters smoking marijuana, and scenes of a sexual nature including nude characters engaging in intercourse although their genitals are not visible at the time.

ESRB MATURE 17+ for Blood and Gore, Intense Violence, Nudity, Sexual Content, Strong Language, Use of Drugs. Some sequences enable players to use stealth attacks against enemies—approaching from behind, slitting their throats. Players can also use explosives to set enemies on fire or blow enemies apart into limbs/bloody chunks of flesh. Cutscenes depict further instances of violence: a human captive bound and hung from a noose before being disemboweled; assailants beating a restrained woman's arm with a hammer; characters shot in the head with arrows; a man repeatedly pistol-whipped. The game contains some sexual content: a couple disrobing and briefly engaging in a sexual act; the couple is heard grunting/moaning as the screen turns black (depicted from the waist up with female toplessness). Some zombie creatures are depicted with exposed breasts and genitalia. One sequence depicts two characters smoking a marijuana joint in a room full of marijuana plants. The words “f**k” and “sh*t,” appear in the dialogue.

Accessibility

The Last of Us Part II has a huge range of accessibility settings (more details here).

The game has been widely praised for these features and even includes settings to specify whether it's easier for you to hold controller upside-down or sideways, which rotates the directional buttons, left stick, and right stick to match.

You can play with one stick and certain actions can be automatically done for you, for example auto-pick items, walking through gaps, jumping. The biggest issue is having to shake the controller to recharge your flashlight, it can be remapped to a touchpad swipe.
Difficulty

How you can adjust the challenge of play, and assistance the game offers when you fail or get stuck.

Difficulty Options

Select Difficulty: Select difficulty from a range of presets.

Customise Difficulty: Customise different aspects of the game.

Adjustable Anytime: You can adjust the difficulty while playing.

Cognitive Pressure

Reaction-time Not Critical: Individual game actions don’t need quick reactions.

Low Pressure: Game tasks aren’t time-limited or with a high emphasis on performance. Or there is a low pressure play-mode available.

Assistance

View Control Mapping: You can view a map of controls during play.

Assistance When Stuck: The game notices if you get stuck and provides assistance, such as skipping levels, hints or tutorials.

Assistance With Controls: You can get the game to assist aiming, steering, reloading, jumping, running etc.

Assistance With Direction: Indication of where to go next with arrows, cookie trail and the like.

Tutorials: There are helpful tutorials, instructions and tips.

Reading

How much reading or listening comprehension is required, and how accessible this is.

Moderate Reading: Moderate reading required.

Text Visibility

Large Clear Text: Text is large and clear, or can be adjusted to be.

High Text Contrast: Text colour contrasts to background.

Subtitles

Large Clear Subtitles: Subtitles are large and clear, or can be adjusted to be.

Any spoken content has subtitles: All spoken content has subtitles, or there is no speech in the game.

Speaker Indicator and their Tone: Captions indicate who is speaking and their tone.

Voiced

All Dialogue is Voiced: All of the game dialogue and narrative can be voiced.

Menus are Voiced: All of the game menus can be narrated for easier navigation.

Controls

How you control the game, different options for alternative inputs and whether you can remap these settings to suit your needs.

Gamepad

Required inputs for the game, or that can be setup with remapping.

Multiple Buttons & Single Stick: Can play with multiple buttons and a stick.

Multiple Buttons & Two Sticks: Can play with multiple buttons and two sticks.

Motion Controls Available: You can use motion controls, tilting the controller to steer for example.

Remap Controls

You can customise the controls for the game as follows:

Remap Buttons: Re-map all buttons/keys.

Swap Sticks: Swap the sticks over.

Remap Sticks: Remap the stick controls to buttons/keys.

Invert X/Y Axis: You can invert the direction required to control looking and aiming.

Holding Down Buttons Optional: Holding down buttons not required or can be turned off or switched to toggling the action on and off.

Rapid Pressing Optional: Quick, repeated button pressing not required or can be skipped or disabled.

Controller Vibration

Vibration Optional: Controller vibration not used in the game or you can disable it.

Informative Vibration: Controller vibration indicates aspects of the game, echoing visual and audio cues.

Adjust Mouse/Stick Sensitivity, Deadzones and Thresholds: Adjust how sensitive mouse/stick controls are and the related deadzones and thresholds.

Image

How you can adjust the visuals to suit your needs, and offer additional information if you can't hear the game.

Visibility

Large Game Elements: Game characters and other elements are large and distinguishable.

High Contrast Mode: You can adjust the contrast of the game to be high-contrast.

Outline Interactive Elements: Characters, platforms and enemies can be outlined for visibility.

No Flashes: No flashing strobe effects or you can disable them.

Audio Cues for Visual Events: Audio is provided to indicate visual events.

Motion sickness friendly: Option to reduce motion sickness (motion blur, depth of field, field of vision).

Colour Options

Colourblind friendly: Game doesn’t rely on colour or can switch to colourblind friendly mode.

Colour adjustments: Adjust colours of characters or game elements for greater visibility

Head-Up-Display Visibility

Clear Interface: The game navigation, maps and information are clear to read, large or adjustable.

Adjust Head Up Display: Remove or resize head-up display to remove distraction and make more visible.

Audio

How you can adjust the audio of the game and whether audio cues compensate for aspects of the game that are hard to see.

Customise Audio Levels: Control volume levels of specific events and elements in the game.

Visual Depiction of Directional Audio: Indication on screen with arrows, icons, located colour splashes and the like, to show where directional audio for damage, footsteps, environmental or way-finding sounds are coming from.

System Settings

PlayStation 4 has a range of accessibility settings. Some are system only, some work in games (invert colours and button mapping)... read more about system accessibility settings.

Supported by PlayabilityInitiative


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Similar Games

The following games are like The Last Of Us II. They address a similar topic or offer a similar way to play. They are good options to play next and also good alternatives to The Last Of Us II for younger age ratings.

The Last Of Us II is in These Lists

In addition to the similar games listed above, which have been linked to this game specifically in the database, you may find games with a similar theme to The Last Of Us II in the following lists:

Designed With Deaf and Hard of Hearing Features

Video games are a medium that can be enjoyed by a diverse audience, but sometimes, Deaf or hard of hearing players can struggle to enjoy a game due to information not being conveyed to them properly. Audio cues without visual indicators or captions, spoken narrative or direction without subtitles, for example.

However, games that include well-illustrated subtitles or captions can enable these players to understand what's being spoken through dialogue, and what's going on in the surrounding area.

Providing subtitles and captions is a good first step. But also important is that subtitles are readable and stand out from the game. Some games do this by adding a background, or a heavy drop shadow behind the text while others use colours to separate different meanings. Metro Exodus, for example, will inform the player where an enemy is located in the world through captions.

Where audio is used to locate events in the game world, a visual representation of this information is helpful. Games such as Fortnite have an audio visualiser ring that identifies where key audio (and the related event) is coming from. Assassin's Creed Odyssey uses a similar feature to indicate nearby dangers.

Games that enable Deaf and hard of hearing players with subtitles, captions and visual indicators are hugely welcomed by the community, with wider accessibility benefits for other players who can opt to benefit from these interface enhancements as well.
 

Attempt The Impossible

How hard a game is considered to be depends on who is playing it. A three-year-old tackling Zelda will struggle. But equally a new-to-games-parents will find Mutant Mudds quickly gets beyond them. The games in this list are known for being difficult. They wear the difficulty as a badge of honour. "None shall pass," except this with the will, time and belligerence to get good enough at this particular activity to beat the high bar the game sets.

This might be grappling with the flying mechanics in Rocket League, getting endlessly lost trying to find the next guardian in Shadow of the Collosus or coming up with the right tactic to get enough money for the ship you need in Elite. Of course, some of these games can be made easier, but to play them at their best is to ramp up the difficulty to max (crushing on The Last Of Us for example) and let them give you all they've got.
 

Inhabit Another World

Whether it’s a simple puzzle grid, a battlefield or a universe of planets to visit, all games create virtual spaces in which to play. Some of these are simply the background to a campaign - the game’s unfolding drama, missions or challenge. But others invite you to invest in the worlds they create, move in, tend to and inhabit in fantastical ways.

The games in this section invite you to spend time in spaces that have a sense of place, life and character. Worlds that hold history and lore in their landscapes, flora, fauna and inhabitants; environments that respond to your presence and invite you to restore them to their former glory.
 

Designed To Be Easier To See

These games, compiled by Christy Smith, have graphics styles or options that make the games easier to see for people with impaired vision. Many of these games include
  • Fonts: Larger, scalable font sizes and bold fonts, like Moving Out.
  • Zoom: Ability to increase the size of all objects on the screen such as in Untitled Goose Game's zoom feature.
  • Contrast: Settings to adjust contrast and brightness, as well as distinct colours with good lighting, like Splatoon.
  • Non-Visual Cues: Sounds and haptic feedback that help direct the player, like Lego games.
  • Colourblind: Modes that invert colours or change colours to accommodate different types of colourblindness, such as in Hue.
  • Screen Readers: Functions that read text and menus as they are highlighted and appear on the screen, such as in Eagle Island.
In addition, there are other ways to make games easier for people with low vision to play. Some offer modes that lower the difficulty, like the Assist Mode in Super Mario Odyssey. Playing with a sighted friend or family member can make things much easier.

Some platforms provide system-wide accessibility features that help. The Nintendo Switch offers a built-in zoom function, while the Xbox offers co-pilot mode that allows two people to play as a single player. Such features create necessary flexibility for players.

There are many different types of visual impairments, and no two people ever see things the exact same way. Because of this, games that are accessible for one person may not be accessible to all low vision gamers. For gamers who find visual games too cumbersome, audio-only games may provide a solution.

Image 164 It may be difficult for parents and caregivers who are fully sighted to understand which games will be easier to see. The best way to learn about what works and what doesn’t is hearing from people with impaired vision themselves. Can I Play That? has a variety of reviews discussing accessibility of games for people with disabilities, by people with disabilities.
 

Big Budget Popular Games

These games are big, brash and popular. They have big budgets which means the visual and interactive quality is particularly high. They also have strong and wide ranging player communities.
 

Walk in Someone Else's Shoes

While many games include characters to interact with, some are specifically designed to make relationships a central element. Whether this is during the rounds of a puzzle game amidst a zombie outbreak or as we race cars around a circuit, they can offer a unique way to think deeply about how we relate to each other and to the games people play.
In contrast to films or books, characters and relationships in video games need to be discovered by the player. Some of my favourite relational moments in games happen amidst other action. Often these other actions – whether shooting, puzzle-solving, or fetching and carrying – serve to underline the difficult, awkward and snatched nature of interpersonal interactions.
 

Designed For Easier Play

These games go above and beyond just adding a few difficulty settings. They consider a wide range of ability and accessibilities by offering customisable difficulty settings as well as special low pressure or assist modes that aid progress.
 

Designed For Reduced Motor Function

These games’ mechanics and options make it possible to adapt the experience to be accessible for people depending on your physical capabilities.
  • Remap Controls: Remapping buttons and swapping joysticks (like Fortnite) help customize the player’s way to interact with the game, also helping players that use only one hand.
  • No Holding: Some games (like Moving Out) also offer the option to avoid having to hold any buttons down for actions like aiming, opening or equipping. You can use simple taps or toggles instead to reduce muscular fatigue.
  • Sensitivity: Some of these games (like Fortnite) also enable you to adjust control sensitivity as well as controller vibration if that is present.
  • Fewer Buttons: Simpler controls (like FIFA) are good to consider, as well as those that offer extensive difficulty settings.
  • Speed: Reducing how fast a game plays (like Eagle Island) is a helpful setting.
  • Difficulty: Offering customisable difficulty, like how fast a game plays (like Eagle Island) or adding invincibility (like Celeste), and other features allow tailoring the game to the player’s needs.
This list and accessibility details in each game was compiled the help of Antonio Ignacio Martínez and Kyle “onehandmostly”. Please be aware that options may vary depending on the platform you choose to play. Also there is no game that works the same for everyone, so be mindful of your own needs when considering this information.
 

Survive The Night

Surviving in games is often a key element. Some games, however, make it the main focus. With minimal resources and little light can you make it through to the morning? Can you prepare a shelter as the daylight dwindles in time for you to cope with the lurking creatures of the dark?

Whether this is as simple as closing the door to keep the zombies out in Minecraft or as complex as crafting food, clothing and medicine to cope with the freezing blackness of The Long Dark these games are exhilarating as they pose a strategic puzzle with personal consequences.

Many of these games offer an open world in which to survive, which opens up more ways of preparing for and then making it through the night time. This, of course, leads to another day where you need to spend time and resources wisely while exploring your surroundings.
 

Wake Up Your Emotions

Video games are known for high-octane, adrenaline-fuelled entertainment, but there are many that address the player’s emotions as much as their dexterity. Often overlooked by younger or more competitive players, these experiences can provide a helpful variety in the diet of games your family enjoys.
The games selected below create emotionally rich spaces in which to explore scenarios with feelings rather than facts. In some games this is achieved with beautiful or soothing interactive visuals; others create charged relationships and settings that invite players to take a role in processing these emotions.
 
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