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The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword Review

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Posted: 15 months ago, last updated 2 weeks ago.

Author: @GeekDadGamer, Jo Robertson and Ben Kendall.

OverviewOverview

The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword is an adventure game in the Zelda series. You play Link and navigate the floating island of Skyloft before diving down to the land below it. While the island locations and flight drew from Wind Waker, the combat and interactions were a perfection of motion controls tried in Twilight Princess with the addition of the more accusation Motion Plus peripheral to the Wii Remote.

The game is the earliest in the Zelda timeline, and tells the story of the origins of the Master Sword. Link must ensure Zelda's safety and stop Ghirahim as he attempts to resurrect his master, Demise.

Fighting enemies makes use of the motion controls of Link's sword and shield. Movements are mapped to the direction the Wii Remote is motioned and enemies are designed to anticipate and block attacks.

The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword HD is a version on the Nintendo Switch with optimised motion controls and new button controls. When playing with two Joy-Con controllers, these become your sword and shield. Swing the right Joy-Con to have Link swing his sword in-game and use the left Joy-Con to raise his shield to block enemy attacks.

There are many games in the Zelda series, each received long and focused development from Nintendo:
  • The Legend of Zelda (1986) on NES
  • The Adventure of Link (1987) on NES
  • A Link to the Past (1991) on Super NES and Gameboy Advance, then ported to Wii, Wii U and Switch (as part of Nintendo Online).
  • Link's Awakening (1993) on Gameboy then updated for Switch
  • Ocarina of Time (1998) on Nintendo 64 then updated for 3D on Nintendo 3DS
  • Link’s Awakening DX (1998) on Gameboy Colour
  • Majora's Mask (2000) on Nitendo 64 then updated to 3D on Nintendo 3DS
  • Oracle of Seasons and Oracle of Ages (2001) on Gameboy Colour
  • Four Swords (2002) on Gamecube
  • The Wind Waker (2002) on Gamecube then updated in HD on Wii U
  • Four Swords Adventures (2004) on Gamecube
  • The Minish Cap (2004) on Gameboy Advance
  • Twilight Princess (2006) on Wii and Gamecube then in HD on Wii U
  • Phantom Hourglass (2007) on Nintendo DS
  • Spirit Tracks (2009) on Nintendo DS
  • Skyward Sword (2011) on Wii
  • A Link Between Worlds (2013) on Nintendo 3DS
  • Tri Force Heroes (2015) on Nintendo 3DS
  • Breath of the Wild (2017) on Switch
  • Breath of the Wild Sequel (TBA) on Switch

DetailsGame Details

Content Rating: PEGI 12

Release Date: 23/11/2011

Platforms: Switch, Wii and Wii U

Genres: Action, Adventure, Narrative, Open World, Physically Active and Role-Playing

Accessibility: 19 features

Developer: @Nintendo

CommitmentCommitment

Duration: This game will take between 45 hours and 60 hours to complete.
 
Players: This is a single player game.

CostsCosts

The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword usually costs £17.99 to £49.99.
 

The Legend Of Zelda: Skyward Sword HD

Switch Store Switch £49.99

The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword

Switch Store Wii U £17.99
 
Does not offer in-game purchases, 'loot boxes' or 'battle/season passes'.

Age RatingsAge Ratings

Content Rating

Rated PEGI 12 for violence.
In the US, ESRB state: As players explore dungeons and temples, they use swords, whips, boomerangs, and bows to solve puzzles and defeat fantasy creatures (e.g., skeletons, giant spiders, demons). Some ranged weapons allow players to shoot projectiles (e.g., arrows) from a first-person view; players can perform various swords strikes, including a finishing attack: Link jumps through the air to strike creatures and bosses into the ground. The somewhat frenetic combat is highlighted by slashing effects, cries of pain and colourful splash effects as enemies are hit; enemies usually break apart and disappear in clouds of smoke when defeated. A handful of sequences involve bathroom humour (e.g., a character sitting on a toilet, flushing sounds).

AccessibilityAccessibility

In the Switch version of the game you can use the (separately purchased) Amiibo characters at any time to create a checkpoint. Tapping the amiibo again returns to the checkpoint. This offers the ability to save as well as fast travel.

The Switch version of the game requires you to hold a button down to be able to control the camera. You also need to quickly execute Left-Right-Left to do a spin attack and click the stick down to use your shield. Also, the dialogue text is smaller on the higher resolution Switch display. You can, however, fast forward text on the Switch by pressing B. The Switch version now provides the name of the character who is speaking, which the Wii version didn't do. Also, the Switch version interrupts play with dialogue less often, and provides players with optional dialogue icons.

The Wii game required you to use motion controllers to trigger attacks and other actions in the game. You can view the bottom mappings on the screen while playing. The game map in dungeons has to be collected before you can use it.
 
Our The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword Accessibility Report documents 19 accessibility features:


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