Close search results

Features

What's New on Family Video Game Database Today

28/03/2020 22:38:27

Author: Andy Robertson


With the database regularly growing with new games, this is the best place to find out what we've added and updated. Check back to find out what New Games, New Lists and Updated Games are on the database today.

Recently Added To Database

We constantly add new games recommended by families or for new lists we are creating. If you’d like to suggest a new game or list that we should add please do email. You can see a full list of new games, as well as the ones we've added over the last few:

New Releases

The following games have just come out. While we continue to add games new and old to the database, these are the ones the press will be reviewing and talking about right now. You can browse a full list of games ordered by release date, or check out the most recent releases here:


As well as individual games, here are the series we've been trying out in the family:

Upcoming Releases

The following games are coming out later this year or have been recently released. As with all the games in the database these are the titles we are most excited about playing and from what we have seen think they will be a great match for a range of families. You can browse a full list of upcoming games or check out the most recent ones here:

Recently Added Game Lists

To help you discover games, we organise games in lists. These group together games that offer a similar experience and range from the common (Compete on the Couch) to the less usual (Solve a Mystery). Here are the three most recent lists we've added:

Good For Reduced Fine Motor Control

We've worked with SpecialEffect on this list of games which aims to highlight games that are good for people with reduced fine motor control.

Special Effect is a charity that aims to put fun and inclusion back into the lives of people with physical disabilities by helping them to play video games. They use technology ranging from modified joypads to eye control to find a way for people to play to the very best of their abilities.

“We discussed several conditions which can impact fine motor control such as cerebral palsy, brain injury, digital amputation, Nerve conditions, chronic pain, arthritis/RSI or high spinal injury. People with these and similar conditions might identify with some of the following phrases:
  • “I can hold on to things well, but I find it difficult to let go”
  • “I have one hand stronger than the other”
  • “My fingers don’t move much, but I can move my arms in big movements”
  • “Doing things with one hand or one hand at a time is easier than using both hands”
  • “Holding and using a standard controller at the same time can be tricky”
  • “I would find larger joysticks and buttons potentially helpful”
Along with physical input considerations like mounting your controller to access to more buttons or using peripherals with larger buttons and joysticks, this list focuses on games that meet some of the following criteria:
  • Require one input at a time either joystick or button: like Mario Kart, Bubbles the Cat or Sonic the Hedgehog.
  • Offer button remapping: Such as Marvel's Spider-Man or Stardew Valley.
  • fewer buttons: like Oco, Mario Kart 8, Alto's Odyssey.
  • Offer motion control: Such as Splatoon, Wii Sports, Arms, Just Dance, Kinect Sports.
  • Support gamepads rather than requiring keyboards: Such as Luigi's Mansion, New Pokemon Snap, Kirby's Epic Yarn.
  • Low time pressure and give more time for larger movements: Such as Flower, A Short Hike, Alba, Firewatch, Rocket League.
  • Turn off the need for rapidly repeated button presses: Such as Sea of Thieves, Biomutant, Assassin's Creed Valhalla.
As well as the games we have picked out below that meet these criteria, there are some common searches on the database that are good for people with reduced fine motor control: 1 Stick + 1 button, 1 Stick, 1 Button, Motion Controls, Reamp Buttons or Remap Keys, Low Pressure, Rapid Pressing Optional and Co-Piloting

We hope this list helps you discover games that work for you. If you are struggling to game due to access issues caused by a physical disability do contact SpecialEffect who will offer support free of charge, as capacity allows.
 

Designed For Players Without Sight

The progress that large video game publishers are making with low vision or sightless accessibility is impressive. High profile titles like The Last of Us Part II and Microsoft Flight Simulator are inspiring and exciting. However, games designed from the ground up for players with low vision or without sight offer many a more satisfying experience.

We’ve worked with Aaron Spelker on this list of games that offer a bespoke experience for low-vision or sightless players. This has expanded our database search for Play Without Sight and added a new Play Without Sight with VoiceOver criteria. These games offer experiences that entertain, intrigue and challenge players through spatial audio, text to speech and voice-work. We’re excited about the games here, but first, we want to share Aaron’s story.

Aaron is an author (The Bubonic Reorder), commentator, accessible game reviewer and father. He runs the Apple iPhone iOS Voiceover Compatible Games Facebook page where vision-impaired members discover a wide variety of games, swap tips and answer questions.

He has loved console games his entire life. But two and a half years ago, he lost his sight in an accident. “One day I was sighted; the next day I was blind,” as he puts it. He soon sat down to play The Last of Us: Part 2, in the hope of finding an entertaining accessible game but found that the “gameplay felt hollow and unsatisfying”.

“The Last of Us: Part 2 has done something exceptional with its extensive accessibility efforts. In fact, I feel guilty that I failed to have a fun experience with the game,” he told us. “But I realized that I was comparing my blind gameplay with my sighted gameplay from earlier years. Playing graphics-rich games as a blind person ultimately made me feel inadequate and depressed. I was so distraught by the interaction that I packed up the controller and have not played a console system since.”

However, my desire to play games did not dissipate. I longed to get lost in a game world. With the loss of my sight, I needed that distraction from life’s daily struggles even more. I began searching the internet for accessible video games for the blind and vision impaired.

He found a deep pool of accessible games on smartphones such as the iPhone and started to work through its catalogue. “While playing these games, I became thoroughly familiar with the iPhone's VoiceOver screen reader. This accessibility tool allows a blind person to have any text on the phone screen read out loud through a series of swipes and taps.”

There were games that went beyond the commonly accessible text adventures, word puzzles and dice games. They were immersive games with 3D Worlds, like A Blind Legend and A Detective’s Demise. Or adventure games where the vision-impaired gamer fought enemies, like A Dark Room. There were also action games where you drove cars (Blind Drive), manage sports teams (Football Chairman Pro) and fight dragons (Swordy Quest).

“They allowed me to reestablish my love of video games because they are primarily focused on the gameplay rather than high-quality graphics. Therefore, vision-impaired players do not feel left out or left behind. The vision-impaired player can have the same game experience as the sighted player. For me, this was what I needed. It increased my gaming confidence and enjoyment. While I loved 40 years of sighted gaming, I have now found a rich community of non-vision games and gamers to engage with for my next 40 years.”
 

Great Guidance From PlayStation 5 Activity Cards

PlayStation 5 Activity Cards are a part of the operating system that provide a quick and easy way to see your progress, and get helping progressing (or finding what you’ve missed) in games. It’s a really neat part of the system that you can pop-up while playing by pressing the PlayStation button on the controller.

They are like your very own guide, tailored to your current play through, providing information on progress, tips on things you've missed, more things to do (and how long they will take) and short videos of how to complete objectives (that you can pin to the side of the screen while you are playing).

However, as with the use of PS5 Dual Sense features, different games do this in different ways. Some just include Activity Cards to load and save your game or access a game mode (which saves time but isn't a game changer) while others go to town on tips, hints and other helpful ways to get more from their game.

As one player put it, "Honestly, I'm just really enjoying them in Control where they tell me where to go when I'm lost in the wonderfully convoluted building. Then in Maquette it's extremely useful to just get a step solved for me when otherwise I'd switch to another game. These are the kind of frustrations that generally stop me from beating games. It's like having a Prima guide on my PS button."

The games in this list are those we think do a great job with Activity Cards. This not only provides quick travel, fast loading, how long main- and side-quests will take, tips and video guides but is a real reason to consider buying the PlayStation 5 version over the Xbox Series X|S.
 

Recently Updated Game Details

We also go back and check older games as more families feed into our information and advice. The games we’ve updated or added to new lists are as follows.


Image of the cover of the hardback edition of the Taming Gaming book  by Andy Robertson Image 311 Thank you for using our resource, supported by AskAboutGames, ParentZone and PlayAbility Initiative. We are editorially independent, written by parents for parents, but welcome sponsorship, partnership and suggestions. Email our editor for details on these opportunities.

The information on this database is designed to support and complement the in-depth discussion and advice about video game "addiction", violence, spending and online safety in the Taming Gaming book. If you have any concerns or questions in these areas, email our editor who is quick to respond or can arrange for a one-to-one conversation.

YouTube | Facebook | Twitter | Discord | Contact | Help

Promoted